The story about disappearing cruise ship passengers has been picked up by MSNBC.

This may be a statistically improbable thing to care about, since 10 million people cruise each year and around 12 have gone overboard during voyages in five years.

However, each incident affects thousands of people, because the ships turn back to participate in searches, and some may involve foul play rather than suicide or accident.

There also can't be many more grim tragedies to endure than a loved one who disappears off a ship in the middle of the ocean, never to be found. Seven years after Amy Bradley was lost on the Royal Caribbean Rhapsody of the Seas, her family still has no answers for what happened to the 23-year-old.

-- Rogers Cadenhead

Comments

Maybe like Spaulding they just went off swimmin' to Cambodia or something.

Be Well.


 

On a recent cruise of the Hawaiian Islands one of our cabin stewards took a more than casual interest in our daughter and 5 year old son. He wanted them to meet him on shore during some of the stops. He had a particular interest in our grandson and the whole situation upset me although I couldn't convince my daughter that it was strange. He wanted to keep in touch with her so I am worried. What's your take on this?
sailor59@sbcglobal.net


 

Correction to above message. It involved our grandson, not our son.


 

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